Covid infection risk seems to rise with the number of covid vaccinations taken

In a study released to MedRxiv doctors at the Cleveland clinic have found a link ( positive correlation ) between the number of covid vaccinations a person has taken and their risk of contracting covid-19. Every additional vaccination seems to increase the overall risk of covid infection during the period of the study. No explanation is offered for this correlation. The relative risk of infection compared to an unvaccinated person for the number of vaccines given is:

Code:
1, x 1.7

2, x 2.36

3, x 3.1

4, x 3.38

So someone who has had 3 or more doses of covid vaccine was more than three times as likely to be infected with covid, during the study period, than someone who has never been vaccinated. Here is that information in chart form.

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/medrxiv/early/2022/12/19/2022.12.17.22283625/F2.large.jpg?width=800&height=600&carousel=1

Here is a link to the study which was designed to assess the effectiveness of the new bivalent vaccines:
https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/...625v1.full

And a video commentary by Dr John Campbell

Covid infection risk seems to rise with the number of covid vaccinations taken

What will this data mean for the people living in Gibraltar? It may be remembered that it confirms the findings of an earlier study undertaken by the British government, which also showed increased infections occuring after the covid jab:

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More jabs, more infections - that's odd!

This study from Cleveland, Ohio, ought to be a game changer. It appears that this video has been taken down now - Dr John Campbell's video:

More jabs, more infections - that's odd!

Here's a source on the Pfizer representative saying that they did not test for stopping transmission before rolling out to the public: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnxlx... The study in question: [https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.11...]

Pfizer did not know whether Covid vaccine stopped transmission before rollout

You won't find it in the abstract or conclusion -- go to Figure 2.

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